unconditional

Part of speech: adverb

Unconditionally.

Part of speech: adjective

Limited by no conditions; absolute.

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Usage examples "unconditional":

  1. But Sir Walter Mauny was forced to make answer that the King, his lord, was so much enraged at the delay and expense that Calais had cost him, that he would only consent to receive the whole on unconditional terms, leaving him free to slay, or to ransom, or make prisoners whomsoever he pleased, and he was known to consider that there was a heavy reckoning to pay, both for the trouble the siege had cost him and the damage the Calesians had previously done to his ships. - "A Book of Golden Deeds", Charlotte M. Yonge.
  2. Here, swayed by the stronger influence of old associations, she was herself again; the same well- poised, imperious little creature that she was when she first coolly " bearded the lion in his den, the Douglas in his hall," and brought the old Colonel to unconditional surrender. - "The Little Colonel at Boarding-School", Annie Fellows Johnston.
  3. The conventional attitude towards such matters is, of course, that of unconditional scepticism. - "Confessions and Criticisms", Julian Hawthorne.