peel

Part of speech: verb

To strip off the peel of; remove or be detached, as a rind or skin.

Part of speech: noun

Skin; rind; bark.

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Usage examples "peel":

  1. In 1835, when Sir R. Peel first met Parliament after his acceptance of office, consequent on the King's dismissal of Lord Melbourne's ministry, the Opposition encountered and defeated him twice in the first week of the session- on the choice of a Speaker, and on the address, though the latter had been framed with the most skilful care to avoid any necessity for objection; but no attempt was made by him to call in question the perfect right of Lord J. Russell and his followers in the House to choose their own time and field of battle. - "The Constitutional History of England From 1760 to 1860", Charles Duke Yonge.
  2. The chance that had served him lay in the facts that Mary Peel had fallen gravely in love with him, that her sole surviving relative was a rich uncle, and that George's surname was the same as hers and her uncle's. - "The Matador of the Five Towns and Other Stories", Arnold Bennett.
  3. It's funny how some men can't fall: if they slip on a banana- peel somebody shoves a cushion under 'em before they 'light. - "The Iron Trail", Rex Beach.