inculcate

Part of speech: noun

Inculcation.

Part of speech: verb

To impress upon the mind; teach.

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Usage examples "inculcate":

  1. He tells his sister of " Ernest Renan, a Frenchman I met in Paris," and notes the considerable resemblance between their lines of endeavour, observing, however, that Renan is chiefly " trying to inculcate morality, in a high sense of the word, on the French," while he is trying to inculcate intelligence on the English. - "Matthew Arnold", George Saintsbury.
  2. Mine is that masculine species of charity which would lead me to inculcate in the minds of the labouring class the love of independence, the privilege of self- respect, the disdain of being patronized or petted, the desire to accumulate, and the ambition to rise.... - "A Short History of English Liberalism", Walter Lyon Blease.
  3. A careless or lazy plumber causes much worry, for, even though his victims may have learned the lesson I am endeavoring to inculcate throughout these pages, it is a self- evident proposition that they will not allow his indifferent work to stand without correction. - "Quit Your Worrying!", George Wharton James.