eleemosynary

Part of speech: adjective

Of, pertaining to, or dependent on alms; charitable.

Part of speech: noun

A recipient of charity.

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Usage examples "eleemosynary":

  1. But it excites our wonder and grief that statesmen, who have superfluous means for covering the country with barracks, should find themselves unable to establish comfortable asylums for all the poor who are incurably diseased, in which they should be so provided for, that it would be as criminal in them to ask, as in others to afford them, eleemosynary relief. - "A Morning's Walk from London to Kew", Richard Phillips.
  2. Monarchs might give the revenue of a suppressed convent to a cook, as reward for a successful pudding; the surface of Britain and the continent might be covered with abbeys and monasteries now converted into lordly palaces- passing thus from the dead hand of the Church into the idle and unproductive palm of the noble; but the ancient ecclesiastical establishments of the free Netherlands were changed into eleemosynary institutions, admirably organized and administered with wisdom and economy, where orphans of the poor, widows of those slain in the battles for freedom by land and sea, and the aged and the infirm, who had deserved well of the republic in the days of their strength, were educated or cherished at the expense of the public, thus endowed from the spoils of the Church. - "History of the United Netherlands, 1609", John Lothrop Motley.
  3. The Majority Report, which amongst other things said, " We consider it obvious that Irish development will not be fully served by the railways until they cease to be commercial undertakings," found favour mostly, I think, with those who looked upon Ireland as an exceptional country requiring eleemosynary treatment, and whose railways ought, in their view, to be placed beyond the ordinary healthy necessity of paying their way. - "Fifty Years of Railway Life in England, Scotland and Ireland", Joseph Tatlow.