deride

Part of speech: noun

Derider.

Part of speech: adverb

Deridingly.

Part of speech: verb

To treat with scornful mirth; ridicule.

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Usage examples "deride":

  1. But ’ tis the Christian’ s praise, Above impossibilities to raise The weakness of our nature; and deride Of vain philosophy the boasted pride. - "The Poetical Works of Edward Young, Volume 2", Edward Young.
  2. Always the opponent of sane social reforms which Socialists deride as " melioration" or as futile attempts to shore up an obsolete system, it has consistently disassociated itself from such men as Lord Shaftesbury, who did more to better the conditions of the working classes than anyone who has ever lived. - "Secret Societies And Subversive Movements", Nesta H. Webster.
  3. Almost had he uttered the vow, when, tugging hard at his heart, came the vision of Esclairmonde's loveliness, and he felt it beyond his strength to resign her voluntarily; besides, how Madame of Hainault and Monseigneur de Therouenne would deride his uncertainties; and how intolerable it would be to leave Esclairmonde to fall into the hands of Boemond of Burgundy. - "The Caged Lion", Charlotte M. Yonge.