coeval

Part of speech: adjective

Of or belonging to the same age or period.

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Usage examples "coeval":

  1. One is still extant that was formed as early as A. D. 336, and another drawn up for the Church in Carthage dates from A. D. 483. The origin of Christian Calendars is clearly coeval with the commemoration of martyrs, which began at least as early as the martyrdom of Polycarp, A. D. 168. The Church Calendar is set forth in the introductory portion of the Prayer Book, consisting of several Tables giving the Holy Days of the Church with their Proper Lessons, and also the ordinary days of the year with the Daily Lessons. - "The American Church Dictionary and Cyclopedia", William James Miller.
  2. The resurrection is coeval in duration with the judgment of the world; for both are called the last day, and both are represented as involving all mankind in one assemblage to be judged and in one assemblage to be raised. - "Twenty-Four Short Sermons On The Doctrine Of Universal Salvation", John Bovee Dods.
  3. There is no reason to suppose that, seeing that sacrifice and covenanting for a vast length of time, were observed together, they were not coeval. - "The Ordinance of Covenanting", John Cunningham.