abrogation

Part of speech: noun

Authoritative repeal.

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Usage examples "abrogation":

  1. Both required a courage that was nothing less than heroic: but the proclaimers of the Declaration of Independence risked life, family, property; engaged in an irreconcilable conflict against enormous odds; defied the greatest naval power in the world, and the richest nation, in pursuit, not of the material gain to be derived from the abrogation of a tax, but of national liberties which they were determined to secure at every hazard. - "The Nation in a Nutshell", George Makepeace Towle.
  2. Ryland Randolph, an Alabama editor who was also an official of the Klan, stated in his paper that " the origin of Ku Klux Klan is in the galling despotism that broods like a nightmare over these Southern States- a fungus growth of military tyranny superinduced by the fostering of Loyal Leagues, the abrogation of our civil laws, the habitual violation of our national Constitution, and a persistent prostitution of all government, all resources and all powers, to degrade the white man by the establishment of Negro supremacy." - "The Sequel of Appomattox A Chronicle of the Reunion of the States, Volume 32 In The Chronicles Of America Series", Walter Lynwood Fleming.
  3. There, where Muhammad had to confront Jews and Christians, he was at first politic in his aim to win them over to his side, and then, when he found them obstinate, the doctrine of abrogation came in conveniently. - "The Faith of Islam", Edward Sell.